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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
, demanding strict new curbs on government surveillance. the national security agency checked far more user data than the companies realize. i am joined by a national technology reporter for the washington post. are the tech companies here motivated by principle or profit? >> i am guessing both. nobody likes having their stuff stolen, and that is what has happened here. it is bad business for users to think their information is going to be stolen if they give it to google or yahoo. they knew they were giving information to the u.s. government under court order. but the extent has taken this them by shock. data was selected from fiber on particular cables over southeast. >> what about the chance of a new law being passed? >> hard to know where this is going. the u.s. congress is not known for its efficiency. this has gotten the world's attention. i think the shape is early to tell, but i wouldn't be surprised to see some kind of act. >> doesn't the government have a case when it cease it needs all this information to protect national security. >> sure. if my job was to prevent titleist attac
. the details come from edward snowden, who leaked a trove of material from the national security agency last summer. intelligence officials maintain the data collection operation has thwarted a number of terror attacks. a presidential advisory panel has been reviewing the issue. its findings could come this week. we hear now from the tech world. brad smith is the general counsel and an executive vice president of microsoft. he's also speaking on behalf of the companies that signed today's letter. >> brad smith, welcome to the program. what is it that the government is doing that microsoft and the other companies want them to stop? well, throughout our industry we're concerned about the increasing reports that government surveillance including in the u.s. but also elsewhere has gone beyond what people understood. we see a need for reform. and specifically we're hoping that there will be clear legal rules, all of this should take place pursuant to the law there should be stronger executive oversight there needs to be enhanced review by the courts. and there needs to be a bit more transparency,
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)